/These ten convicted extremists are due for automatic early release within MONTHS

These ten convicted extremists are due for automatic early release within MONTHS

These are the faces of ten extremists who are set to be back on Britain’s streets within months under existing laws which allow them to be released midway through their prison sentences.

Yesterday, Boris Johnson vowed to overhaul this current system and stop 220 terrorists from being freed early.

Yet lawyers are already warning the Prime Minister’s snap proposal could backfire because it does not guarantee the extremists are placed under the same supervision which they get in the transition period when they are released early.

And last night it emerged that around 20 suspected Jihadists are being ‘rigorously tracked’ on the streets of Britain.

Understaffed operations mean most struggling resources are being sent to new alerts, The Mirror reports.

Terrorists are currently freed after serving half or two-thirds of a sentence, depending on when they were jailed and the type of punishment imposed. 

Some may have had to serve longer if their behaviour behind bars was disruptive. 

However, they may have spent time on remand before conviction – which is effectively deducted from the sentence. 

The Prison Service refuses to discuss individuals, but the Daily Mail’s Home Affairs Correspondent David Barrett has named names some of the convicted terrorists thought to be due to be eligible for release this year – yet are among the extremists now in jail likely to be affected by the Prime Minister’s plan.

Mohammed Ahmed was jailed 15 years and three months in 2015 for preparation of terrorist acts. He could be released in November

Mohammed Ahmed was jailed 15 years and three months in 2015 for preparation of terrorist acts. He could be released in November

Yusuf Sarwar jailed 15 years and three months in 2015 for preparation of terrorist acts. He could be back on the streets in November

Yusuf Sarwar jailed 15 years and three months in 2015 for preparation of terrorist acts. He could be back on the streets in November

Mohammed Ahmed (left) and Yusuf Sarwar (right) were jailed 15 years and three months in 2015 for preparation of terrorist acts. Their earliest release date is November

Moinul Abedin jailed 20 years in 2002 for intent to cause an explosion. Earliest release: November. Britain’s first al Qaeda-inspired terrorist, arrested in 2000

Moinul Abedin jailed 20 years in 2002 for intent to cause an explosion. Earliest release: November. Britain’s first al Qaeda-inspired terrorist, arrested in 2000

Aras Hamid jailed eight years in 2016 for preparing acts of terrorism. Earliest release: May

Aras Hamid jailed eight years in 2016 for preparing acts of terrorism. Earliest release: May

Moinul Abedin (left) was jailed 20 years in 2002 for intent to cause an explosion. His earliest release is November. Meanwhile Aras Hamid (right) was jailed for eight years in 2016 for preparing acts of terrorism. His earliest release is May

Patrick Kabele jailed six years for preparation of terrorist acts. Earliest release: February. Attempted to travel to Syria to join Islamic State

Patrick Kabele jailed six years for preparation of terrorist acts. Earliest release: February. Attempted to travel to Syria to join Islamic State

Jamshed Javeed jailed six years in 2015 for preparing acts of terrorism. Earliest release: March. Manchester teacher who planned to fight with IS in Syria

Jamshed Javeed jailed six years in 2015 for preparing acts of terrorism. Earliest release: March. Manchester teacher who planned to fight with IS in Syria

Patrick Kabele (left) jailed six years for preparation of terrorist acts. Earliest release: February. Meanwhile Jamshed Javeed (right) was jailed six years in 2015 for preparing acts of terrorism. His earliest release sate is March

Zakariya Ashiq jailed six years in 2015 for preparing for terrorism. Earliest release: November. Tried to join IS but was arrested at Heathrow on his way back into UK

Zakariya Ashiq jailed six years in 2015 for preparing for terrorism. Earliest release: November. Tried to join IS but was arrested at Heathrow on his way back into UK

Fahim Adam jailed 30 months in February 2019 for having documents useful for terrorism. Earliest release: May. IS file on his phone had tips on ‘lone wolf’ knife attacks

Fahim Adam jailed 30 months in February 2019 for having documents useful for terrorism. Earliest release: May. IS file on his phone had tips on ‘lone wolf’ knife attacks

Zakariya Ashiq (left) was jailed for six years in 2015 for preparing for terrorism. His earliest release isNovember. Fahim Adam (right) jailed 30 months in February 2019 for having documents useful for terrorism. Earliest release: May

Mohammed Khilji jailed five years for encouraging terrorism. Earliest release: March. Shared graphic terrorist videos on WhatsApp of soldiers being beheaded

Mohammed Khilji jailed five years for encouraging terrorism. Earliest release: March. Shared graphic terrorist videos on WhatsApp of soldiers being beheaded

Mohammed Ghani jailed 28 months in May 2019 for possessing documents containing terrorist information. Earliest release: March

Mohammed Ghani jailed 28 months in May 2019 for possessing documents containing terrorist information. Earliest release: March

Mohammed Khilji (left) jailed five years for encouraging terrorism. Earliest release: March. Meanwhile Mohammed Ghani (right) jailed 28 months in May 2019 for possessing documents containing terrorist information. Earliest release: March

As the PM scrambled to appease a national outcry over early released terrorists:

  • Sources said Streatham terrorist Sudesh Amman failed to attend deradicalisation courses in prison and was associating with extremists, telling them he approved of the London Bridge terror attack last year;
  • He was described by school friends as a dope-smoking weirdo who vowed: ‘When I grow up I am going to be a terrorist’;
  • His ex-girlfriend described their relationship as ‘one of the worst experiences of my life’;
  • One of the two people he stabbed was revealed to be a nursery teacher who had been out for coffee with her friends;
  • Police raided the home of Amman’s associate, a drug dealer who is understood to have met the terrorist while playing video games online.

Some senior lawyers have poured cold water on Mr Johnson’s overhaul of the system, and said it risks offenders walking free with no surveillance while simultaneously causing a huge backlog in the courts.  

Law Society of England and Wales president Simon Davis said: ‘Time on licence is intended as a transition from prison to full release.

‘If the licence period is instead spent in custody, we risk releasing inmates without any supervision, without any transition and without any opportunity for the probation service to recall them to prison if there are concerns about their post-release behaviour. 

‘If the rules for some prisoners are now changed mid-sentence so that time on licence is actually spent in prison, there is greater chance those prisoners will want to appeal their sentences – further clogging up an already overloaded system.’  

In the wake of yet another jihadist attack by a recently freed prisoner, Boris Johnson (pictured in Greenwich, London, today) is planning sweeping laws to prevent the early release of terrorists

In the wake of yet another jihadist attack by a recently freed prisoner, Boris Johnson (pictured in Greenwich, London, today) is planning sweeping laws to prevent the early release of terrorists

In the wake of yet another jihadist attack by a recently freed prisoner, Boris Johnson (pictured in Greenwich, London, today) is planning sweeping laws to prevent the early release of terrorists 

Sudesh Amman (pictured as a teenager) stabbed two people on Sunday in Streatham, south London

Sudesh Amman (pictured as a teenager) stabbed two people on Sunday in Streatham, south London

Sudesh Amman (pictured as a teenager) stabbed two people on Sunday in Streatham, south London

Amman - wearing a hoax explosive vest (left circle) - was shot dead by undercover officers on Streatham High Road just after 2pm yesterday after snatching a blade (right circle) from a shop and slashing a man in his 40s and a woman in her 50s

Amman - wearing a hoax explosive vest (left circle) - was shot dead by undercover officers on Streatham High Road just after 2pm yesterday after snatching a blade (right circle) from a shop and slashing a man in his 40s and a woman in her 50s

Amman – wearing a hoax explosive vest (left circle) – was shot dead by undercover officers on Streatham High Road just after 2pm yesterday after snatching a blade (right circle) from a shop and slashing a man in his 40s and a woman in her 50s

Amanda Pinto QC, chair of the Bar Council, said: ‘In light of this announcement, we would urge the Government to take care in considering any sentencing changes that may apply retrospectively.

‘Sentencing is a complex exercise, requiring consideration of a range of factors, including the need to express clearly and publicly the nature of the penalty which is being imposed, which we note was done in this case.

‘It is important that any proposed reform which could retrospectively alter the punishment for an offence, should be the subject of careful consideration, to ensure that it complies with the rule of law.’

A spokesperson for the Parole Board said: ‘Given the recent events at London Bridge and Streatham, the Parole Board understands and welcomes the Government’s plans to ensure that terrorist offenders are not released automatically, as occurred in these incidents but are instead considered by an independent panel of the Parole Board. Our over-riding priority is the protection of the public.’ 

Robert Buckland, the Lord Chancellor and Justice Secretary, says he wants all terrorist inmates to undergo a parole review rather than being entitled to automatic release part-way through their sentences. 

Police forensic officers work at the scene in Streatham High Road, south London after a man was shot dead by armed officers

Police forensic officers work at the scene in Streatham High Road, south London after a man was shot dead by armed officers

Police forensic officers work at the scene in Streatham High Road, south London after a man was shot dead by armed officers

This will apply to serving prisoners – thought to be around 220 – as well as those jailed in the future, he said, because of the ‘unprecedented situation of severe gravity’ facing this country. 

Terrorists will only be eligible for release at two-thirds of the way through their sentence and only when the Parole Board agrees, he said.  

Government sources said a review will look at whether some terrorists ‘should ever be released’. 

They hinted at an entirely new sentencing structure which would hand offenders a set number of years in prison, but they would not be released at all if they continued to pose a threat. 

In other words, ministers may re-introduce controversial ‘indeterminate’ sentences. 

Separately, last month Home Secretary Priti Patel announced offences such as ‘preparing acts of terrorism’ would have sentences significantly boosted in a new Bill. The minimum term would increase from three years to 14. 

There will be emergency legislation this week to introduce restrictions on automatic release. Other measures will require an Act of Parliament. 

The Parole Board will be bolstered with a new independent body, possibly named the ‘terrorist public protection panel’. 

It will comprise judges and former judges familiar with terrorism cases to decide when extremists should be freed. 

The Lord Chancellor will have been warned he risks breaching terrorists’ human rights. 

Retrospective legislation potentially presents problems. Under the European Convention on Human Rights – enshrined in UK law under Labour’s Human Rights Act 1998 – criminals are entitled to be dealt with by the law as it stands at the time. 

We HAVE to get tougher or more may die: Former head of Counter Terrorism at the Met RICHARD WALTON says all terrorists should serve their full term 

Commentary by Richard Walton, Former head of counter terrorism at the Met

The covert operation of the kind deployed by the Met’s Counter Terrorism Command (SO15) against the Streatham attacker Sudesh Amman, a terrorist released recently from prison, was a major and complex undertaking.

Sudesh Amman (pictured), was shot dead by police after he stabbed people in Streatham, south London, on Sunday

Sudesh Amman (pictured), was shot dead by police after he stabbed people in Streatham, south London, on Sunday

Sudesh Amman (pictured), was shot dead by police after he stabbed people in Streatham, south London, on Sunday

As I know from my time leading the Counter Terrorism Command, such operations are extremely costly and can be used only against a small number of targets, due to the finite number of specialist officers available nationally to carry them out.

That up to 25 officers were being used to watch Amman’s every movement once he was released means that he was likely to have been considered a top ten terrorist threat in the UK. But why was he free in the first place?

To follow him – and reportedly stop his attack within seconds – would have required highly trained, dedicated surveillance officers, working alongside a covert specialist firearms team in support.

The cost of running such an operation is tens of thousands of pounds per week. If 24-hour surveillance is needed, the price tag can sometimes exceed £1million, should the operation run from months into years.

At any one time in the UK, these high-priority operations are run against the targets whom MI5 and counter-terrorism police assess as being the most ‘high threat’ to the public.

Weekly meetings decide which subjects should receive the most intense and costly surveillance and senior police officers decide if the operation merits the deployment of firearms officers.

The senior investigating officer in the Counter Terrorism Command who authorised this operation has undoubtedly saved lives by correctly deploying a firearms team as part of the covert operation. Had Amman not been immediately confronted by armed officers when he embarked on his attack, many lives could have been lost.

Online gaming addict who wanted to play violent Call of Duty ‘in real life’

Sudesh Amman was an obsessive online gamer who told friends he wanted to play the violent ‘shooter’ video game Call of Duty ‘in real life’.

Intelligence were first tipped off about Amman’s extremism when he posted pictures in gaming chat rooms of an IS flag and a cache of weapons.

The Dutch blogger who first alerted the UK authorities infiltrated the terrorist’s chats on the encrypted messaging service Telegram.

Mark Van Den Berg – who exposes online extremism – spotted Amman, who used the name Abu Malik, talking about Call of Duty with another jihadist. He wrote in a 2018 blog: ‘Malik indicates that he would rather play the game COD, or Call of Duty, in real life than virtual.’ Yesterday he released screenshots of Amman’s chats, including one which read: ‘Splash splash (stab someone). Make an kuffar (non-believer) drown in his blood. Joke not tryna be bait for all u feds.’

The revelation came as the family home of another of Amman’s online gamer friends was raided yesterday. 

Rezwan Khan, 20, had been arrested on suspicion of preparing acts of terrorism at the same time as Amman in May last year but, although police said the arrests were linked, he was released.

No arrests were made after the latest raid on the house in Bishop’s Stortford, Hertfordshire.

 

But there simply aren’t enough officers to follow every known and dangerous terrorist. Even in this case, with all the resources involved, Amman managed to stab two people before the attack was stopped.

It is a welcome step that the Justice Secretary, Robert Buckland, announced emergency legislation in the House of Commons yesterday that means no terrorist offenders will be released automatically having served half of their sentence with no review.

Any release before the end of their sentence will be dependent on risk assessment by the Parole Board, he said.

Now no terrorist offender will be released before the end of their custodial term unless the Parole Board agrees it, and offenders will be considered for release only once they have served two-thirds of their sentence.

But the Government could go further. The threat that terrorist prisoners pose is extremely high, both inside and upon release from prison.

In a paper published just two weeks ago by the think-tank Policy Exchange, entitled Justice that Protects, I recommended that all terrorist offenders should serve their full term.

I argued that a specially convened Parole Board should oversee – with support from the police and intelligence agencies – a comprehensive threat and risk assessment of all terrorist offenders being released into the community, even once they have served their full sentence.

I would also recommend that ministers consider a legally robust system with judicial oversight of ‘post-sentence detention’ for the very small number of the most dangerous terrorist offenders, prohibiting their release if they are assessed by the police and intelligence agencies as continuing to present a direct threat to national security.

Australia introduced this in 2016 for renewable annual periods of three years.

Had this been in place, Amman would not have been released – and last night, the mood music in Whitehall was that this is being considered.

As a country, we remain naive when dealing with seriously dangerous Islamist terrorists.

The time has come to put public safety first, to get tough on known convicted terrorists who subscribe to one of the most dangerous ideologies in modern times.

Quite simply, they should not be released unless we are confident that they do not pose a serious threat to our safety. The public expects nothing less.

Richard Walton is a Senior Fellow of the Policy Exchange think-tank

Hundreds of terrorists will be kept locked up for longer under sweeping new laws in the wake of the Streatham knife attack – as PM declares: ‘I have come to the end of my patience’

By Larisa Brown, David Barrett and Rebecca Camber 

Justice Secretary Robert Buckland also announced a major review yesterday which could see terrorists jailed for life or permanent conditions placed on their release.

The UK faces an ‘unprecedented situation of severe gravity’, he said, after Sudesh Amman knifed two people just days after he was freed from Belmarsh jail.

In an extraordinary move, ministers will introduce emergency legislation this week to stop 220 extremists already in jail being set free half way into their sentence.

Mr Buckland said serving terrorist prisoners will not be released before their full sentence has been served without a risk assessment from a beefed-up Parole Board, in a move likely to face a huge backlash and legal challenge.

The body – made up of ‘cynical hardened’ former judges and experts – will assess whether a prisoner should be let out two-thirds of the way into their sentence. If they believe they are still a danger, then they will have to serve the entirety of their sentence.

Crucially, the new law will apply retrospectively to all 220 terrorist prisoners currently in jail. It will be put before MPs as soon as this week.

Following the attack on Sunday, Prime Minister Boris Johnson said he had come 'to the end of my patience' with the freeing of offenders

Following the attack on Sunday, Prime Minister Boris Johnson said he had come 'to the end of my patience' with the freeing of offenders

Following the attack on Sunday, Prime Minister Boris Johnson said he had come ‘to the end of my patience’ with the freeing of offenders

Justice Secretary Robert Buckland has announced a major review which could see terrorists jailed for life or permanent conditions placed on their release

Justice Secretary Robert Buckland has announced a major review which could see terrorists jailed for life or permanent conditions placed on their release

Justice Secretary Robert Buckland has announced a major review which could see terrorists jailed for life or permanent conditions placed on their release

The Government also announced that it would order a review into how to deal with terrorists in the longer term.

This could see terrorists only let out if they are believed to no longer pose a danger – a move which could see them jailed for life, or, permanent conditions placed upon them. 

Following the attack, Prime Minister Boris Johnson said he had come ‘to the end of my patience’ with the freeing of offenders before they had completed their sentences and without any scrutiny.

De-radicalising people was a ‘very, very difficult thing to do’, he said.

Amman became the second person to have a committed a terror attack after being released early from jail in less than three months. Whitehall officials last night said he had to be released under current laws even though he was considered a danger to society.

Sources said he failed to attend de-radicalisation courses in prison and was associating with extremist prisoners.

A Whitehall official said: ‘He was a bad man all the time he was in prison. He was associating with extremists and continued to say extreme things.

‘They tried everything they could to … change his behaviour and it didn’t work.But they said they could not keep him in jail because there was not enough evidence to commit him of a fresh offence.’

Pictured: A forensic officer at the scene following the terror attack in Streatham High Road

Pictured: A forensic officer at the scene following the terror attack in Streatham High Road

Pictured: A forensic officer at the scene following the terror attack in Streatham High Road

Amman attended Friday prayers and had access to imams during his time at Belmarsh prison. A security source said: ‘We had serious concerns about his mind set before he went in and his time in prison didn’t alleviate those concerns.’

Amman was considered among the ten most dangerous men in Britain when he was released.

In Greenwich, the PM said de-radicalising people was a ‘very, very difficult thing to do’.

He added: ‘There is a big psychological barrier… and that’s why I stress the importance of the custodial option and that’s why I have come to the end of my patience with the idea of automatic early release. This is a liberal country, it is a tolerant country, but I think the idea of automatic early release for people who obviously continue to pose a threat to the public has come to the end of its useful life.’

Mr Buckland said: ‘We face an unprecedented situation of severe gravity and, as such, it demands that the Government responds immediately.’

He told the Commons that the Parole Board would be ‘strengthened’ and steps would be taking to introduce the plans ‘as soon as possible’. The PM earlier said the new parole panel would be made up of ‘cynical hardened people who would look into their eyes’ and determined if they were safe to be released.

Critics have asked whether keeping terrorists in prison longer just increases the chance of them being further radicalised. 

Amanda Pinto QC, chairman of the Bar Council said: ‘We would urge the Government to take care in considering any sentencing changes that may apply retrospectively.’ But Lord Macdonald QC, a former director of public prosecutions, said: ‘These proposals are slightly controversial but justifiable. It is no longer tenable to release people who are still ideologically committed to committing terrorist acts.’

Dr Alan Mendoza of the Henry Jackson Society, said: ‘The Government’s plans restore a degree of common sense to the way we handle society’s most dangerous individuals.’

 

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