/Heavy snow warning issued by Met Office over two days

Heavy snow warning issued by Met Office over two days

Brits look set to be blasted by up to four inches of snow over two days, according to a Met Office warning.

The Met Office has put out a wind and snow alert for Scotland and Northern Ireland as Storm Ciara batters the UK.

The warning is due to last from midnight on Monday until noon on Tuesday.

It states: “Frequent and heavy snow showers will affect the region throughout Monday and at first on Tuesday.

“Snow showers will mainly be over high ground. Slight accumulations of 1 to 3 cm above 150 metres and 5-10 cm above 300 metres.

“Strong winds, gusting 50-60 mph, will lead to blizzard conditions at times and considerable drifting of lying snow.

The wind and snow warning for Monday and Tuesday

“Frequent lightning strikes are also possible, perhaps leading to interruptions to power supplies.”

The Met Office has issued a yellow weather warning for wind covering the whole country on Sunday.

A smaller wind warning, covering all of Scotland, a small part of north-west England and Northern Ireland will also be in force on Saturday.

Power networks could struggle and travel plans face disruption as Ciara follows in the footsteps of Storm Brendan who left the country in chaos last month.

Blustery conditions on Friday night and Saturday will give way to full force gales on Sunday, moving into Monday – while the spread of the weather warning will likely be refined closer to the time.

Parts of the south of England are sensitive to flooding after a month of wet weather, and Ciara promises plenty of downpours.

Seaside areas are on full alert as 38ft waves off some coasts are likely.

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Met Office meteorologist Grahame Madge described the weather front as “Ciara rather rudely barging her way through”, taking conditions from “rather benign” to “very unsettled”.

He said: “There’s the potential for 80mph gusts in exposed locations across parts of the UK.”

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